Tag: 上海松江车墩鸡很多

  • Blue Ridge Outdoors Top Towns Nominee: Morgantown, West Virginia

    first_imgMorgantown, West Virginia sits in the northeastern part of the state between interstates 79 and 68. While this lively community of just under 30,000 is probably best known as the home of the West Virginia Mountaineers Big East football squad, its potential for outdoor recreation is not to be overlooked.Situated along the wide and winding Monongahela River, Morgantown provides several access points to whitewater of varying classes. To find some of the area’s best whitewater options, head southeast of town toward the Cheat Canyon or the Cheat Narrows. For hiking, biking, and climbing opportunities visit the 12,000-acre Coopers Rock State Park.Cudas_IB_0814_2Did you know? Every June Morgantown hosts a downhill half marathon known as the Decker’s Creek Half with a cumulative elevation drop of 800 feet.Vote now at blueridgeoutdoors.com!last_img read more

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  • WHO sets meeting on flu pandemic containment

    first_imgMar 3, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – Public health experts will meet in Geneva next week to continue developing the World Health Organization’s (WHO’s) draft plan for quick action to head off a potential influenza pandemic.The WHO announced the meeting as a Hong Kong official reported another possible human case of H5N1 avian flu in China, involving a 32-year-old man who died yesterday.The WHO released a draft rapid-response plan at a Tokyo meeting in January. More than 30 experts in epidemiology, virology, public health, laboratory issues, and other disciplines will meet Mar 6 through 8 in Geneva to continue work on the plan, the WHO announced today.Officials said the meeting would focus on three areas: operations (logistics), surveillance and epidemiology, and public health measures, such as quarantines, antiviral treatment, and social distancing, the agency said.WHO spokeswoman Fadela Chaib said the purpose of the meeting is “to decide who—the WHO, its members nations and its partners—would do what in the event of a pandemic,” according to an Agence France-Presse (AFP) report published today.Many experts are skeptical that stopping an emerging pandemic is possible, and the WHO has acknowledged that it will be very difficult at best.”Even if the pandemic cannot be stopped, public health interventions might buy time to allow countries to further strengthen their response systems, as well as accelerating the production of pandemic vaccine,” the agency said today.The WHO draft plan released in January called for completion of the strategy in time to allow training of rapid-response teams to begin in May.In Hong Kong today, a health department official said a 32-year-old man died of suspected avian flu yesterday in the southern Chinese city of Guangzhou, according to an AFP report today.The man had fallen ill with a fever and pneumonia on Feb 22, a spokesman for Hong Kong’s Centre for Health Protection was quoted as saying. He said China’s health ministry and the Guangdong provincial health department had told Hong Kong that the man had a suspected case of avian flu.If confirmed, the case would be China’s 15th human case of avian flu and 9th death.The report came a day after Chinese Vice Premier Hui Liangyu warned that China could face more human cases and poultry outbreaks of avian flu this spring.Elsewhere, Azerbaijan today reported its first outbreak of H5N1 flu in farm poultry, according to an AFP report. The virus was first reported in wild birds in Azerbaijan 3 weeks ago.Agriculture Minister Ismet Abbassov said about 500,000 birds had already been killed in an effort to contain the poultry outbreak, AFP reported.Also today, the Netherlands-based environmental organization Wetlands International accused five countries of refusing to cooperate with its efforts to study H5N1 flu in wild birds, according to another AFP report.The organization said Sudan, Turkey, Tunisia, Iran, and Nigeria have refused to admit research teams, the story said. The group blamed the countries’ reluctance on fear of the possible effects on poultry exports and tourism if infected birds were found.The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization has commissioned Wetlands International and the French agricultural research center Cirad to study H5N1 among wild birds in Africa, Europe, and the Middle East, according to AFP.”It becomes harder to predict new outbreaks and to take the right precautions if we don’t know the situation in these important countries,” Wetlands International was quoted as saying.See also:Mar 3 WHO announcementhttp://www.who.int/mediacentre/news/notes/2006/np04/en/index.htmlJan 27 CIDRAP News story “WHO issues rapid-response plan for flu pandemic”last_img read more

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  • Niche market

    first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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  • Campus workers continue fight for wage increase

    first_imgCorrection: A previous version of this story stated the rally was hosted by UNITE HERE Local 11 labor union and the Student Coalition Against Labor Exploitation. It was actually hosted by UNITE HERE Local 11 labor union, the Clergy and Laity United for Economic Justice (CLUE-LA) and the Student Coalition Against Labor Exploitation. The Daily Trojan regrets the error. Mariya Dondonyan | Daily Trojan Mariya Dondonyan | Daily Trojan Sarah Dhanaphatana contributed to this story. Mariya Dondonyan | Daily Trojan Mariya Dondonyan | Daily Trojan Mariya Dondonyan | Daily Trojan The fight for a wage increase for campus hospitality workers intensified Thursday evening, with nearly 200 demonstrators protesting throughout the University Park campus.The rally, hosted by the UNITE HERE Local 11 labor union and the Clergy and Laity United for Economic Justice (CLUE-LA), in conjunction with the Student Coalition Against Labor Exploitation, is the most recent demonstration in a campaign that began last November.“When I came to work at USC, I thought it would be better for my children, that I would be better off here to be part of the Trojan family,” said Abigail Lopez, an employee at the on-campus restaurant Lemonade. “But after a while, when you notice your check and how hard you work, how it’s not fair … you realize we’re like the lower-class citizen.”Local 11, a union for hospitality and service workers in Los Angeles and an affiliate of the national union UNITE HERE, is campaigning for two main changes to the recently expired contract between the union and the university: a $15 per hour wage and full-time hours for employees.“Most people who work at USC do not have 40 hours of work, maybe 36, 35,” said Ofelia Carrillo, a member of the communications team for the union. “Some people have been here for 42 years and still do not have full-time work.”The university employs roughly 900 hospitality workers, and the workers’ current contract has been expired since June 30. In the six months since, union and university officials have not been able to reach an agreement.Though the university has offered a wage increase of 25 cents, many workers stress it isn’t sufficient.“Twenty-five cents is not enough for us to survive,” said Renita Shepard, an employee at Lemonade.Wednesday’s rally began at 4 p.m., with community members, students, workers and union coordinators congregating at the United University Church on the north side of campus.From there, the protesters separated into seven locations across campus, including the Radisson Hotel at USC, the on-campus restaurant Moreton Fig and the Ronald Tutor Campus Center.The separate groups then gathered in Hahn Plaza at approximately 5:30 p.m., where for about 30 minutes the demonstrators marched in a large circle that spread across the university square.“[USC officials] sit in their suits and think they have the power, but there is nothing more powerful than students and workers and community coming together,” said SCALE member Sarah Newell at the demonstration. “This is the moment where USC changes, and we will fight until it is right.”This rally is the first official demonstration of the semester, with one previously being held in November. SCALE member Jenny Vallegas shared that the union is fully organizing the workers’ campaign, and that the students involved are instead standing in solidarity with the workers as representatives of the USC community.“We’re here to leverage our privilege as students and to speak up on what is going on,” Villegas said. “We have stakeholdership, we pay tuition.”The union campaign, dubbed “Let’s Raise SC!”, states that the average yearly wage for USC hospitality workers is approximately $18,800, citing a university statistic. Workers active in the cause stressed that the earnings are not enough to live in Los Angeles.“At the standard we are at right now, we are barely surviving,” said Paco Torres, a worker at the student dining hall Cafe 84. “We’re living check-to-check.”Carillo shared that the yearly wage statistic was sent to the union by the university and was not union-calculated. University officials could not confirm the number as of press time.In a statement, USC maintained that they are confident a contract agreement will be reached and spoke to the benefits Local 11 employees receive at the university.“In addition to wage and health benefits that compare very favorably to similar settings outside the university, Local 11 employees at USC also are eligible for some other valuable university benefits offered to faculty and staff, including free tuition for themselves and their dependents, retirement contributions from the university and more,” Thomas Sayles, senior vice president for university relations, wrote in a statement to the Daily Trojan. “We also provide extensive training, and through that training, the opportunity for upward mobility in their employment here.”The protest comes at the heels of President C. L. Max Nikias’ announcement to the campus community on Tuesday that the university had reached the $4 billion mark of USC’s $6 billion fundraising initiative. Nearly $732 million was garnered in gifts in 2014 alone.This is not the first time the union has demonstrated at USC. One hospitality worker in particular, Maria Villalobos, shared that this is the third protest campaign she’s participated in over the 42 years she has worked at USC. Los Angeles County labor leader Maria Elena Durazo, who was a key part of the union’s last campaign in the 2000s, stressed that this is not a fight that the campus workers will give up soon.“If we have to prove again to USC that we will fight until fairness and justice are reached in the union contract, then we will walk out, we will strike, we will picket, we will march, we will get arrested,” said Durazo, currently vice president for immigration, civil rights and diversity at UNITE HERE. “We will fight back, and we will win.” Mariya Dondonyan | Daily Trojanlast_img read more

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