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  • COVID-19: Indonesian embassies ramp up efforts to help citizens abroad

    first_imgIndonesians diplomatic missions are ramping up efforts to help citizens abroad who are facing hardship amid the stringent measures imposed by many countries in the battle against COVID-19.For the last few days several embassies have been actively delivering aid to isolated citizens or those whose livelihoods have been disrupted as a result of the policies of the countries they live in.In Australia, for instance, the Indonesian Consulate General in Sydney has delivered aid packages to 210 Indonesians with Work and Holiday Visas (WHV) who have lost their jobs as a result of the COVID-19 crisis. As of Tuesday, the embassy had delivered 860 packages of aid to the affected Indonesian citizens.“Aside from food supplies, they [Indonesians] also asked for aid to cover their residential costs and one-way tickets to return to Indonesia as companies in Kuwait are also facing hardships amid this crisis,” the statement said.Read also: COVID-19: Indonesian mission in Turkey offers virtual assistance to diasporaIn Egypt, the Indonesian Embassy in Cairo is monitoring more than 7,500 Indonesian students, of whom more than 1,400 have notified the embassy that they need assistance amid the pandemic.COVID-19 has forced the students to halt their part-time jobs. In addition, many of the students’ families in Indonesia also faced financial struggles that made providing financial support for the students a challenge.The embassy has, so far, delivered 210 packages of staple foods to the students.“The next phase is to begin soon,” said Indonesian Ambassador to Egypt Helmy Fauzy in a press release on Monday, adding that the embassy would also provide personal protective equipment for them.In Malaysia, Indonesians who lived in red zones such as in Selangor, for instance, had also received a total of 600 packages of aid on Monday.The Malaysian government has been isolating seven villages in Hulu Langat – a district 30 kilometers from Kuala Lumpur, where 500 Indonesian nationals live – since March 30 after 71 cases of COVID-19 were found in the area.”The team [from the Indonesian Embassy in Kuala Lumpur] managed to enter the red zone of Hulu Langat in Selangor after trying for the last three weeks [to get through],” said Soeharyo Tri Sasongko, the embassy’s first secretary in Kuala Lumpur on Tuesday as quoted by antaranews.com.Soeharyo said the convoy carrying the supplies had to face at least seven checkpoints and roadblocks before it finally arrived at the location. The supplies were then transferred to Malaysian authorities’ vehicles as they only allowed people wearing hazmat suits to enter the area.Topics : The packages consisted of staple foods such as rice, cooking oil, eggs, sugar, milk, instant noodles and hand sanitizer – all of which are now scarce in Australia. They were delivered to three states – New South Wales, Queensland and South Australia – Indonesian Consul General in Sydney Heru Subolo said in a statement on Thursday.Heru explained that the aid aimed to help Indonesians who were affected by the physical distancing policy. He also suggested they arrange for their return to Indonesia if they thought it was too difficult to maintain their livelihoods over the next six months.The Indonesian Embassy in Kuwait City, the capital of Kuwait, said on Wednesday that it had been receiving reports from Indonesian citizens starting to face difficulties. The embassy received about 240 reports on April 2, but the number rose to 1,700 on Tuesday.The embassy said in a statement on Wednesday that most Indonesian citizens were concentrated in Sharq, Jahra, Fahaheel, Abu Halifa and Kuwait City, as well as Jleeb and Mahboulla – the two areas that are currently under regional lockdown as authorities in Kuwait have found a significant increase in confirmed cases there.last_img read more

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  • Unnerved by new virus cases in navy, Taiwan debates lockdowns

    first_imgTopics : Spooked by a sharp increase in coronavirus cases in the navy, Taiwan is debating whether to consider a broad lockdown, even with only 174 active infections and weeks after far more seriously affected countries shuttered their cities.Taiwan’s early prevention and detection efforts have so far made it a model for how to contain the outbreak, with 427 confirmed cases to date, of which 253 have recovered. Six people have died.But 29 new infections on a Taiwanese navy ship that was part of a friendly mission to the Pacific island state of Palau last month have caused unease, affecting a previous sense of general safety. The central government, however, says lockdowns are not being seriously considered for now, even as city governments raise the possibility.Although Taiwan has reported a handful of cases where the source of infection is unclear, it has no widespread community transmission, and the majority of cases are termed “imported”, having been brought to the island from people infected overseas.Taiwan does not carry out mass coronavirus testing, saying it has no need because its rates of infection are so low and it can trace the contacts of those who are infected.Last week, Taiwan reported three days with no new cases.”Considering the global and domestic disease situation, and the control over emergency situations, it is not the time to implement a lockdown for Taiwan,” Health Minister Chen Shih-chung told reporters this week. “Everyone should be cautious, but we are very far from having a lockdown.”Late Wednesday, vice-president elect William Lai, who was a physician before entering politics, appealed on his Facebook page for calm, pointing out that lockdowns were for when there was a massive rise in cases that may overwhelm the health system.Infection control for the navy is well in hand, he said, adding: “Please don’t be alarmed”.Taiwan’s military has apologized for the infections and is investigating what happened.About 700 sailors have been quarantined and tested, and the government has sent 200,000 text alerts to the phones of people who might have been in contact with them. center_img Although life in Taiwan has largely continued as normal while the pandemic has swept across the world, the prospect of parts of the island shutting down has jumped up the political agenda.Taipei Mayor Ko Wen-je, a medical doctor, told reporters on Wednesday that next week officials would hold a “tabletop exercise” to simulate how to close down the capital, though he gave no details.”Shutting down a city is not a feel-good move,” Ko said, adding that it would be extra difficult in Taipei, home to parliament and other central government offices.New Taipei city, which surrounds the capital, has already held a lockdown drill, and the major port city of Kaohsiung is planning one in coming days.last_img read more

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  • Millions of Americans join unemployment line as coronavirus savages economy

    first_imgA stunning 26.5 million Americans have sought unemployment benefits since mid-March, confirming that all the jobs gained during the longest employment boom in US history have been wiped out as the novel coronavirus savages the economy.The deepening economic slump amid nationwide lockdowns to control the spread of COVID-19, the potentially lethal respiratory illness caused by the virus, was underscored by other data on Thursday showing business activity sinking to an all-time low in April. In addition, new home sales decreased by the most in more than 6-1/2 years in March.“At this point it would take a miracle to keep this recession from turning into the Great Depression II,” said Chris Rupkey, chief economist at MUFG in New York. “The risks to the outlook are that the economy is digging itself such a big deep hole that it will become harder and harder to climb back out of it.” “Today’s report shows the labor market is almost certainly pushing into new territory, jolting the unemployment rate up above the Great Recession’s 10 percent peak and wiping out more jobs than we’ve gained in the recovery,” said Daniel Zhao, senior economist at Glassdoor, a website recruitment firm.In a separate report on Thursday, data firm IHS Markit said its flash US Composite Output Index, which tracks the manufacturing and services sectors, plunged to a reading of 27.4 this month, the lowest since the series began in late-2009, from 40.9 in March.New home sales fell 15.4 percent to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 627,000 units in March, the Commerce Department said in another report. The percentage decline was the largest since July 2013.Rapid deteriorationThe deteriorating economic data reinforces economists’ contention that the economy entered recession in March.The National Bureau of Economic Research, the private research institute regarded as the arbiter of US recessions, does not define a recession as two consecutive quarters of decline in real GDP, as is the rule of thumb in many countries. Instead, it looks for a drop in activity, spread across the economy and lasting more than a few months.Last week’s claims report covered the period during which the government surveyed business establishments for the nonfarm payrolls component of April’s employment report. Economists are forecasting as many as 25 million jobs were lost in April after the economy purged 701,000 positions in March, which was the largest decline in 11 years.Though weekly jobless filings remain very high, last week’s 810,000 decrease in claims marked the third straight weekly decline in applications, raising hopes that the worst may be over. Weekly claims appeared to have peaked at a record 6.867 million in the week ended March 28.Stocks on Wall Street were trading higher as investors focused on the weekly decline in claims. The dollar slipped against a basket of currencies. US Treasury prices were trading mostly lower.Florida, which together with Tennessee, South Carolina and Georgia is reopening businesses this weekend, continued to see a surge in claims last week. But New York and Michigan reported fewer applications. Georgia reported a drop in claims.The overall decrease in claims has been attributed to difficulties by states in processing large volumes of applications and a historic US$2.3 trillion fiscal package, which made provisions for small businesses to access loans that could be partially forgiven if they were used for employee salaries.An additional $484 billion in a fresh relief package for small business loans is expected soon. The handful of states easing restrictions could serve as a barometer for the overall economy when it reopens.“We would assume jobless claims will fall back sharply here, but if consumers remain reluctant to go shopping or visit a restaurant due to lingering COVID-19 fears, then employment is not going to rebound quickly,” said James Knightley, chief international economist at ING in New York.“As such it would be another signal that a V-shaped recovery for the US economy is highly unlikely.” With weekly claims stabilizing, the focus is shifting to the number of people on unemployment benefits rolls. The so-called continuing claims data is reported with a one-week lag.Continuing claims jumped 4.064 million to a record 15.976 million in the week ending April 11. Continuing claims have not increased at the same pace as initial jobless applications.Economists believe some people thrown out of work because of state-mandated “stay-at-home” orders found employment at supermarkets, warehouses and delivery services companies. They expect the unemployment rate will shatter the post-World War Two record of 10.8 percent touched in November 1982.The jobless rate shot up 0.9 percentage point, the largest single-month change since January 1975, to 4.4 percent in March.Topics : Initial claims for state unemployment benefits totaled a seasonally adjusted 4.427 million for the week ended April 18, the Labor Department said. That compared to 5.237 million in the prior week. Economists polled by Reuters had forecast 4.2 million claims in the latest week.Since March 21, 26.453 million people have filed claims for unemployment benefits, representing 16.2 percent of the labor force. That has led to dire predictions of 30 million job losses during the COVID-19 pandemic and an unemployment rate at levels not seen since the Great Depression. The economy created 22 million jobs during the employment boom which started in September 2010 and abruptly ended in February this year.The rising tide of grim economic numbers has been met with protests, which have largely been viewed as political, for states and local governments to reopen non-essential businesses. President Donald Trump, who is seeking a second term in the White House in November’s general election, has also been growing anxious to restart the paralyzed economy.A handful of Republican-led states are reopening their economies, despite warnings from health experts of a potential new surge in infections. Economists also warn that there is no guarantee that Americans will feel safe to visit shopping malls.last_img read more

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  • Court sentences underage ‘anarcho-syndicalists’ to four months in jail

    first_imgYusri added that the police had completed the case on another three suspects and submitted them to the district court in late April for trial.Read also: Books seized, five arrested as police claim anarcho-syndicalists plan mass looting in JavaPolice arrested five people suspected of being involved in the so-called anarcho-syndicalist group on April 10, after they allegedly painted graffiti inciting people to riot amid public anxiety over the COVID-19 outbreak.Police claimed the suspects had spray-painted the walls of a shopping complex in Tangerang with messages saying “it’s a crisis now; it’s time to burn”, “kill the rich” and “fight or die ridiculously”.They had been charged under articles 14 and 15 of the 1946 Misinformation Law and Article 160 of the Criminal Code on incitement, which carry sentences of up to 10 years’ imprisonment.Human rights activists warned the police following the arrest not to act arbitrarily and make arrests simply based on the ideology of certain people without sufficient evidence to prove their crimes. (vny)Topics : Tangerang District Court in Banten has sentenced two underage members of a so-called anarcho-syndicalist group to four months in prison despite attempts to get them noncustodial sentences.“The underage offenders, identified as A and RH, have been sentenced [to four months in jail] after three failed attempts to enter them in the juvenile diversion program,” Jakarta Metropolitan Police spokesperson Sr. Comr. Yusri Yunus said on Friday, as quoted by kompas.com.In the diversion program, an underage convict can avoid imprisonment and do social work instead. Low-risk youths such as first-time offenders are usually deemed eligible for the program.last_img read more

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  • Auschwitz renovation uncovers objects hidden by prisoners

    first_imgTopics : “These utensils, kept out of sight of the SS guards, were perhaps used by shoemakers, or to prepare an escape or simply to be able to eat,” fund secretary general Hannah Lessing told AFP on Tuesday.The items were likely hidden in the chimney because block 17 was used to house manual workers. “It is no coincidence that a chimney was used as a hiding place in the very building where chimney sweeps were accommodated,” the fund’s structural consultant Johannes Hofmeister said, according to a press release from the fund. The objects are not expected to be on display at the exhibition, due to open in 2021, but instead have been handed over to the Auschwitz-Birkenau museum for conservation. One million European Jews died at Auschwitz-Birkenau, which Nazi Germany set up in occupied Poland in 1940 and which became Europe’s biggest death camp.More than 100,000 others including non-Jewish Poles, Roma, Soviet prisoners of war and anti-Nazi resistance fighters also died there.Items scattered around the camp and its surroundings continue to turn up periodically during works.center_img Renovation works at Auschwitz have turned up spoons, forks, cobbler’s tools and other objects hidden beneath a chimney flue — some that might have been used to plan escapes, a national fund said Tuesday.  The objects, which also include knives, hooks, scissors, pieces of leather and parts of shoes, were found last month in block 17 of the main camp, Austria’s National Fund for Victims of National Socialism said.The fund commissioned the renovation and restoration works in the block at the former concentration camp in Poland in preparation for an exhibition.last_img read more

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  • Equities rally as reopenings trump geopolitical tensions

    first_imgA further easing of lockdown measures across the planet continued to push equities higher on Tuesday, with the reopening of bars, cafes, pools and beaches overshadowing China-United States tensions.Hong Kong was among the big gainers as the Hang Seng ate away at a loss of more than five percent suffered on Friday after China proposed a security law for the city that has many fearing for the future of the financial hub.While some countries such as Brazil, Chile and Russia are enduring rising death and infection tolls, an increasing number of governments are seeing their figures tail off enough to attempt to get societies back to some form of normal. “The positive take on the mobility data suggests fear about the coronavirus is ebbing,” said Stephen Innes of AxiCorp. “Government support during lockdowns has given many people income to spend. If anxiety is not too significant, they will rush out to shopping malls. “Ultimately, the consumer will need to do the bulk of the heavy lifting so confidence to get out of the house and start to live a normal life… will be critical to this recovery.”Adding to the broadly positive outlook is optimism about progress on a vaccine, which would allow the shattered global economy to start bouncing back. But Chris Iggo, at AXA Investment Managers, added: “That does not mean we should ignore the risk of second waves, prolonged weak growth and geopolitical issues.”Tokyo rose more than two percent and Sydney jumped nearly three percent, while Shanghai, Taipei, Seoul, Jakarta, Bangkok and Wellington were more than one percent up apiece.London and Paris jumped more than one percent and Frankfurt gained 0.8 percent.Singapore also put on more than one percent on hopes for fresh stimulus measures by the city-state as the government warned the economy could shrink as much as seven percent this year. Oil builds on rallyHong Kong jumped more than two percent, with analysts saying investors took some heart from comments by China’s point man in the city, in which he said the proposed new security law would not affect the financial hub’s judiciary, autonomy and “one country, two systems” policy.On Tuesday city leader Carrie Lam also sought to reassure investors, saying fears its business-friendly freedoms were at risk were “totally groundless”, and reasserted the pledge over “the independence of the judiciary, the various rights and freedoms enjoyed by people”.Beijing’s decision to push the law on Friday sent the Hang Seng tumbling more than five percent and ramped up already high tensions with Donald Trump, who has continually hit out at China for its role in the spread of the coronavirus.But National Australia Bank’s Rodrigo Catril said that while their standoff is simmering, “equity investors appear more interested in the prospect of economies reopening around the globe”.Crude markets pushed on with their recovery, having suffered a spectacularly bad April, when WTI crashed below zero.The reopening of economies and a massive cut in output by some of the world’s top producers has helped the US benchmark virtually double in value this month.”The market is starting to witness the effect of output cuts along with a reduction in inventories, while the global economy is on its path to recovery,” Will Sungchil Yun, of VI Investment Corp, told Bloomberg News.”Still, there’s caution with the absence of a cure for the pandemic as well as the possibility of a second wave of infections.”Topics :last_img read more

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  • US Senate backs bill to punish China over Hong Kong

    first_imgThe US Senate passed legislation on Thursday that would impose mandatory sanctions on people or companies that back efforts by China to restrict Hong Kong’s autonomy, pushing back against Beijing’s new security law for the city.The measure also includes secondary sanctions on banks that do business with anyone found to be backing any crackdown on the territory’s autonomy, potentially cutting them off from American counterparts and limiting access to US dollar transactions.The “Hong Kong Autonomy Act” passed by unanimous consent. To become law, it must also pass the House of Representatives and be signed by President Donald Trump. Topics : Democratic Senator Chris Van Hollen, a lead sponsor, said in the Senate the legislation would send a clear message to Beijing that there would be consequences if it acts to undermine Hong Kong’s autonomy.The Hong Kong sanctions bill almost passed last week, Van Hollen said, but was blocked by Republican Senator Kevin Cramer – who had co-sponsored it – at the request of the Trump administration, which made a late request for technical corrections.The delay underscored the complications of passing legislation pushing back on China, as the administration pursues a trade deal and the two powers grapple for international influence and clash over human rights.US-China relations have worsened since the coronavirus pandemic, which began in China, hit the United States.center_img China’s security legislation prompted Trump to initiate a process to eliminate special economic treatment that has allowed Hong Kong to remain a global financial center.China hawks in Congress have pushing for a strong US reaction to any clampdown in Hong Kong.”This could be our last opportunity to stay Beijing’s hand before it destroys what is left of freedom in the city,” said Republican Senator Josh Hawley.The Senate also passed a resolution, introduced by Hawley, condemning the proposed security law. last_img read more

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  • Passenger surge at AP I airports continues as COVID-19 test policy relaxed

    first_imgState-owned airport operator Angkasa Pura I (AP I) recorded an increase in passenger numbers in early July after the government extended the expiry date for passengers’ rapid and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test results.AP I president director Faik Fahmi said on Wednesday the decision to extend the validity period for COVID-19 test results had made it easier to travel, consequently boosting flight demand and traffic — a trend seen since large-scale social restrictions (PSBB) were relaxed in June.The national COVID-19 task force issued on June 26 Circular Letter No.9/2020, which extends the validity period for rapid test results that are required to fly from three days to two weeks, and PCR test results from seven days to two weeks. “Passengers have more time to prepare and plan for trips because of the new regulation. In total, we recorded 23,102 flights between April 25 and July 6 at our 15 airports,” he said in a statement.AP I recorded more than 227,000 passengers in the first seven days of July, a huge increase from around 222,000 passengers during the first half of June and 76,000 passengers in the entire month of May.AP I manages 13 airports in central and eastern Indonesia, including Kulonprogo airport in Yogyakarta, as well as other airports in Semarang in Central Java and Banjarmasin in South Kalimantan and Bali.Surabaya’s Juanda Airport was the busiest airport in the first week of July with 723 flights, followed by Sultan Hasanuddin Airport in Makassar and Sultan Aji Muhammad Sulaiman Sepinggan Airport in Balikpapan. The PSBB measures have severely weakened demand for air travel. According to Statistics Indonesia (BPS), the number of domestic air passengers fell 98.34 percent year-on-year (yoy) in May to around 90,000, while international air passenger numbers fell 99.18 percent yoy.To spur the recovery of the aviation industry, another state-owned operator, Angkasa Pura II (AP II), plans to increase the number of available flight slots and normalize its operational hours in July.The airport operator has set a target to make 30 percent of flight slots available at its 19 airports across the country, from the previous 10 to 20 percent made available during the COVID-19 outbreak.“Starting from July, we will focus on the recovery of aviation traffic to support economic activities in Indonesia,” AP II president director Muhammad Awaluddin in an official statement on July 4.Topics :last_img read more

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  • Spain to honor its 28,400 coronavirus victims

    first_imgTopics : Diplomatic supportAmong those attending will be EU Council head Charles Michel, European Commission president Ursula von der Leyen, European Parliament leader David Sassoli and top EU diplomat Josep Borrell. With a watchful eye on the latest virus outbreaks, Spain pauses Thursday to honor its 28,400 victims at a state ceremony joined by top EU and World Health Organization figures.Barely three weeks after coming out of lockdown, Spain has seen a surge in cases and health officials monitoring more than 120 active outbreaks.The most worrying is in and around the northeastern city of Lerida, where the Catalan regional government has issued a stay-home order affecting 160,000 people.  WHO chief Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus will also attend out of respect for “the great number of people who lost their lives to COVID-19 in Spain and the world,” and to stress the UN health body’s support for those fighting the virus, a spokeswoman said. During the memorial, an orchestra will play Spain’s national anthem along with Brahms’ “Sacred Song” and people affected by the pandemic will also speak. The government, which has been severely criticized for its management of the crisis, declared a 10-day mourning period for the victims in late May — the longest since Spain returned to democracy after the fall of Franco’s dictatorship in 1975.Spain suffered a particularly deadly outbreak of the coronavirus which has officially claimed more than 28,400 lives, making it the seventh worst-hit country in the world in terms of death toll. However, figures provided by the National Statistics Institute (INE) and the Carlos III Health Institute showed that in recent months, the death toll in Spain had been between 43,000 and 44,000 higher than the monthly average. But the government says such figures include those who died of other causes or had COVID symptoms and never had a PCR test — a key requirement for being added to the official count. With the population back on the streets and the borders with Europe and a dozen other countries now open, Spain has seen the number of new infections rising. When the epidemic first hit, the government of Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez declared a state of emergency on March 14, allowing it to impose one of the world’s tightest lockdowns.But it has ruled out any renewal of the measure, saying the regional health authorities will be able to control outbreaks. “With the peak behind us, the regions have the necessary tools to tackle particular situations. Fresh outbreaks were expected and are occurring in all countries,” deputy prime minister Carmen Calvo said on Tuesday.  Authorities there and in several other regions have stepped up precautions, with mask-wearing compulsory in public at all times, even if the safety distance can be respected. last_img read more

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  • ‘Culture of fear’: Australian gymnasts reveal ‘dark and horrible’ abuse

    first_imgA host of former Australian gymnasts have gone public with accounts of physical, mental and emotional abuse in the sport, which left at least one young athlete contemplating suicide.Their decision to highlight the “dark and horrible” abuse follows the recent release of American documentary ‘Athlete A’ charting investigations into USA Gymnastics doctor Larry Nassar, who was jailed for life in 2018 after abusing more than 250 athletes.The documentary has prompted a number of gymnasts to come forward in different countries. This month, British Gymnastics launched an independent review into claims of bullying and abuse. “If they weren’t making comments about being ‘heavy for the day’, the next thing they would revert to saying was that I was just stupid.”She said she was speaking up “because behind those smiles on the podium, are dark and horrible things that happen in the gym behind closed doors”. ‘Abuse needs to stop’ Mary-Anne Monckton, a silver medalist at the 2014 Commonwealth Games in Glasgow, said until now she was “scared” to share her story, “but at some point, someone has to stand up for the athletes”.”The abuse [physical, mental and emotional] needs to stop, or at least be stamped out of our sport,” she added.”I, like so many others, have experienced body shaming, have had food withheld, been yelled at until I cried… and been manipulated and ‘forced’ to do things that I was not physically ready for or capable of doing.”Dual Olympian Georgia Bonora also went through “some terrible experiences at major international competitions and national training camps between 2006-2012″.”Throughout that particular time, there was a culture of fear created by people in power,” she said, while stressing that not everyone was at fault.Similarly, Olivia Vivian said after reaching her goal of becoming an Olympian in Beijing in 2008 “I was a broken athlete and even worse, a broken person”, recalling “lots of yelling and many forms of criticism”.Kitty Chiller, who was Australia’s chef de mission at the 2016 Rio Olympics and is now head of Gymnastics Australia, said the organization had “zero tolerance” for any form of abuse.”Ensuring we have a community and a membership that feels safe and is safe, supported and empowered is our highest priority,” she said, adding that a confidential complaints procedure was now in place.”We acknowledge and applaud those who have spoken up — their courage and their voice. I want you to know that we are here to listen. And we are here to act.”In a bid to encourage further dialogue, Gymnastics Australia said it would set up athlete-led “listening groups” to determine what more needed to be done.”While we have accomplished a lot in recent years, I know that our work in this area is not finished, and nor should it ever be,” said Chiller. While none of the Australian allegations involves sexual impropriety, they detail body-shaming, neglect and manipulation, prompting Gymnastics Australia to issue an open letter late Wednesday praising those who have gone public.”At my supposed peak I was an anxious, stressed and depressed teenager,” Chloe Gilliland, who as Chloe Sims won gold at the 2006 Commonwealth Games in Melbourne, said on Facebook this week.”At 17… I felt it was easier to end my own life than to give in to what they wanted me to be.”Gilliland said she suffered from bulimia as coaches constantly told her she was “too heavy”. Topics :last_img read more

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