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  • Cattaraugus County Fair Canceled Due To COVID-19 Concerns

    first_imgImage via Cattaraugus County Fair / Facebook.LITTLE VALLEY – The Cattaraugus County Fair has been canceled due to COVID-19 gathering restrictions.In a post on the fair Facebook page, officials said those with pre-sale tickets to the Justin Moore concert should check their email for refund details.Officials say Moore’s performance has been rescheduled to next year.Additionally, the fairgrounds will be closed through August of this year. “There will be no horse or livestock shows on the grounds through August,” the post read. “4H members with questions regarding the market sale should contact the 4H office. We are working closely with 4H to help exhibitors.”The Chautauqua County, Warren County and Erie County fairs all have also been canceled due to COVID-19 concerns. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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  • Motorcycle Rider Flown From Crash Scene After Being Rear Ended

    first_imgMGN ImageKIANTONE – A Pennsylvania woman was charged with following too closely after allegedly rear ending a motorcycle Friday evening on Kiantone Road in the Town of Kiantone.The Chautauqua County Sheriff’s Office says Amy Mahaffey, 34, of Russell, rear ended a 68-year-old man on a motorcycle.The man deputies say was transported from the scene via helicopter for apparent non-life threatening injuries.Mahaffey was also transported from the scene for non-life threatening injuries, deputies said. She was also issued a traffic ticket to appear in the Town of Kiantone Court at a later date. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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  • New COVID-19 Death, 174 New Cases Reported In Chautauqua County

    first_imgNumber Zip Code 23 2 Active Case Rate (per 100,000 residents) 201.2 14718- Cassadaga0 3.95% 193.6 347.5 18 25 0.0 15 14767- Panama3 56 65 14081- Irving2 0.60% 233.0 14726- Conewango Valley2 Active Cases 14738- Frewsburg13 22 14063- Fredonia21 3.6% 4.7% 14782- Sinclairville3 14736- Findley Lake2 505.4 14787- Westfield4 50-59346 0.7% 3.4% WNY News Now / MGN Stock Image.MAYVILLE – A new COVID-19 related death and 174 new cases of the virus have been reported in Chautauqua County.The Health Department, in an update to the COVID-19 Dashboard, says the 23rd COVID death involved a 90-year-old.Of the new cases, 441 are active with 23 hospitalized. Furthermore, 1,741 people are quarantined countywide.Additionally, health leaders say the seven-day average positivity rate is 7.9 percent, up from 6.3 percent last week. To date there have been 2,477 cases of the virus in the county, with 2,013 recovered.The data ranges from Friday to Sunday.A full breakdown of the update is posted below:COVID-19 Cases by ZIP Code of Residence Percent of Total Cases 192.3 0.4% 0.97% 3 3 2.3% 2 8 0 0.8% 1.2% 12.47% 14775- Ripley4 1.9% 0 14136- Silver Creek10 0.58% 23 20-29484 17.0% 1.6% 421 Age 14757- Mayville2 14720- Celoron0 0.9% 32 0 0.9% 4 2477 50-592 88 5.88% 2 1.4% 12.52% 399 634.1 4 Percent 14724- Clymer7 13 7.15% 0-19335 25.4% 12.52% 21 58 New Cases Total Cases 0.4% 100.0% 0.93% 85 14701- Jamestown43 Age Group 10 14728- Dewittville2 COVID-19 Cases by Known Age No310 211.0 14733- Falconer3 80-897 10 5 5 630 14048- Dunkirk9 14722- Chautauqua0 60-69310 14062- Forestville5 3 Fatality Rate by Age Group 9 40-49333 2.3% 18 30-39309 COVID-19 Cases by Presence of Symptoms at Time of Interview 14784- Stockton0 16 23 8.05% NYS Fatality Rate: 4.86%US Fatality Rate: 1.9%Source: John Hopkins University COVID-19 Tracker 12/9/2020 0.7% All Ages23 34 1030.9 46 Yes1151 28 5 176.3 370.4 70-797 99.7 2.6% 197.4 30 1.3% 1 1.2% 14712- Bemus Point9 35 395.3 40 10 478.7 723.7 21.22% 2 Total 328.5 0.1% 14740- Gerry3 23 19.54% 116 136.3 0.8% 14138- South Dayton1 0.0% 3.51% 19 30 260.1 51 54.7 14723- Cherry Creek2 80-8987 13.52% 1.37% Percent 340.2 19 14750- Lakewood9 153.0 14769- Portland2 107 0.0 461.8 Fatality Rate 13.44% 8 57 Symptoms 513.0 70-79177 1 255.6 11 90+34 14710- Ashville5 441 14716- Brocton2 182.1 370.7 3.9% 78.78% 16.1% 7 0.6% 550.6 862.3 Total Deaths Symptoms Known1461 97 14747- Kennedy1 0-390 0.00% 2.3% 0.4% 10 0.8% 60-693 14781- Sherman5 0.1% 174 10 Number 90+2 40-492 269.3 Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window),Why is 14742 missing?last_img read more

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  • An Irish Blessing! Outside Mullingar, Starring Debra Messing & Brian F. O’Byrne, Opens on Broadway

    first_img Debra Messing Manhattan Theatre Club’s Outside Mullingar, starring Emmy winner Debra Messing and Tony winner Brian F. O’Byrne, will officially open January 23 at Broadway’s Samuel J. Friedman Theatre. The new comedy is written by Tony and Pulitzer Prize winner John Patrick Shanley and directed by Tony winner Doug Hughes.  Star Files View Comments Related Shows Joining O’Byrne and Messing will be Peter Maloney as Tony and Tony nominee Dearbhla Molloy as Aoife. The creative team for Outside Mullingar includes scenic design by John Lee Beatty, costume design by Catherine Zuber, lighting design by Mark McCullough, and original music and sound design by Fitz Patton. Outside Mullingar Show Closed This production ended its run on March 16, 2014 Outside Mullingar follows Anthony (O’Byrne) and Rosemary (Messing), two introverted misfits straddling 40. Anthony has spent his entire life on a cattle farm in rural Ireland, a state of affairs that—due to his painful shyness—suits him well. Rosemary lives right next door, determined to have him, watching the years slip away. With Anthony’s father threatening to disinherit him and a land feud simmering between their families, Rosemary has every reason to fear romantic catastrophe.last_img read more

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  • Meet The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time’s Alex Sharp!

    first_img The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time “I learned to build tables to pay my rent. I found all these distressed wood tables for sale at extraordinary prices online, so I went to Home Depot, got the materials, made the tables and started selling them. I don’t do it anymore. I have a more glamorous job now.” Stage Cred: Sharp graduated from The Juilliard School in May, where he performed in over a dozen productions, including Romeo and Juliet, Twelfth Night, The Cherry Orchard and A Clockwork Orange. “New York City is such a massive, buzzing, high-strung melting pot. On the subway, I look around at other people and I think about where they’re from and what their experiences are. I miss access to countryside, but the city feels like home.” View Comments “Juilliard was a fairly traumatic experience. Having my life mapped out for me 14 hours a day for three years was terrifying. It felt like I was in the Army. But it’s amazing because you can go in and be sh*t and really work out who you are as an actor.” Current Role: A Broadway debut as Christopher Boone, a 15-year-old boy with Asperger syndrome who investigates the murder of his neighbor’s pooch, in the New York transfer of The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time. “Toby the Rat is a real rat. I haven’t met it yet, but I have mixed emotions. I’m not overly familiar with rats as pets, but I’m an animal lover, so I’m sure I’ll grow to love it.”center_img Age: 25 Hometown: London, England Related Shows “I used to drink beer and smoke cigarettes but that’s gone. No room to do that now! But I love to read, and I recently finished The Goldfinch. I’ve written journals about hitchhiking through South America, and I’m trying to turn them into a screenplay.” “I never adjusted to the normal schooling system. I could never just sit still at a desk, so my mother homeschooled me while we traveled North America and Europe. I was climbing all over castles and then learning about the history of them.” Show Closed This production ended its run on Sept. 4, 2016last_img read more

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  • Culturalist Challenge: Rank the Top Broadway Stars on American Horror Story

    first_img View Comments The Broadway.com staff is hooked on Culturalist, the super-fun website that has become the hot spot for top ten lists. In fact, we love it so much that we decided to partner with them! Every week, we’ll challenge you with a Broadway-themed topic and have you head over to Culturalist.com to rank your favorites. Then, we’ll announce the most popular ten choices on The Broadway.com Show every Wednesday! For our first challenge, we’re asking you to consider all of the Broadway stars who have had the chance to show their dark sides on the first three seasons of the FX anthology hit American Horror Story. As we prepare to head to season four’s Freak Show, we want you to pick your top ten Broadway star turns from seasons past. To kick it off, Editor-in-Chief Paul Wontorek has chosen his list right here. Do you agree? Passionately disagree? Make your own! Here’s how: STEP 1 – SELECT: Visit Culturalist to see all of your options. Highlight your ten favorites and click the continue button. STEP 2 – RANK: Reorder your ten choices by dragging them into the correct spot on your list. Click the continue button. STEP 3 – PREVIEW: You will now see your complete top ten list. If you like it, click the publish button. (If you don’t have a Culturalist account, you’ll be asked to create one or sign in with Facebook at this point.) Once your list is published, you can see the overall rankings of everyone on the aggregate list.  Have fun! And look for the results on the October 8 episode of The Broadway.com Show.last_img read more

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  • An Ultramatic New Grease: Live Promo, Tveit’s Naughty Days & More!

    first_img View Comments Grease is the word…and the live TV event of the season! Check out below the exciting new promo for the Fox musical telecast, featuring rehearsal footage of your favorite T-Birds and Pink Ladies and a taste of Jessie J.’s performance of the titular anthem. The stars have also been making the rounds day and night to talk up to show. Take a look to learn what Aaron Tveit said in Kindergarten that got him sent to the principal, why Julianne Hough refuses to say she’s nervous, a live Today Show teaser with Vanessa Hudgens and Carlos PenaVega and more. The hand jive hits the small screen on January 31!last_img read more

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  • Safety First.

    first_img “Good lighting is important any time, but especially when you’re expecting lots of eager children,” Valente said. Aim spotlights to walkways. Consider installing directional lights at the walkway level. Repair or smooth out uneven or rough walkways to keep visitors from tripping. Turn off lights where you don’t want people to go. Put away any yard or gardening tools that can trip excited youngsters or the adults that accompany them. That also keeps children from playing with them and hurting themselves or each other. People driving on Halloween night should be extra careful, too. Drive slow, slow, slow through neighborhoods. Many parents include reflective tape as part of their children’s costumes, but some don’t. So look carefully for children. “If you’re really concerned about your liability as a homeowner in this situation, check your homeowners’ insurance policy,” Valente said. “It should spell out the coverage conditions. If you’re still unsure, call your insurance agent.” Put away outside toys like bicycles, skateboards or balls that can cause falls or other injury to visiting children. If the toys aren’t there, children can’t play on them. Secure or pen up pets that could bark or otherwise frighten children. Costumed children may frighten dogs and cats into reacting unusually by biting or chasing. Use battery-powered candles or flashlights instead of live flames to illuminate jack-o’-lanterns to prevent fires in decorations or loose costumes. Buy individually wrapped candies that make it easy for parents to inspect goodies. Or give small trinkets like pencils, erasers or stickers as a noncandy alternative. Just because trick-or-treaters set out to scare you this Halloween, you shouldn’t scare them at your home. Or at least you shouldn’t scare them with a dangerous yard, said a University of Georgia housing specialist. “Halloween is scary enough,” said Janet Valente, an Extension Service housing specialist with the UGA College of Family and Consumer Sciences. “Don’t make your yard, porch or walkway scary to the point of danger.” Kids (and adults) may be wearing costumes that make it hard to see things they could trip over in your yard. “Costumes shouldn’t block the wearer’s vision,” Valente said. “But making your yard or walkway clutter-free is a quick, easy step to making this holiday a bit safer.” She offers a few suggestions for homeowners expecting trick-or-treaters. Make sure the yard, walkway, steps and porch are well-lit and clear of debris.last_img read more

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  • How hot is it?

    first_imgAlbany: June 26, 1998 (103 degrees).Alma: July 20, 2000 (104).Athens: July 31, 1999 (103).Atlanta: July 17, 1980 (105 – record high for Atlanta).Augusta: Aug. 4, 2006 (103).Blairsville: Has never recorded a temperature greater than 100.Columbus: Aug. 18, 2000 (104).Rome: Aug. 22, 1983(103).Savannah: July 20, 2000 (104). Updated weather information is at www.georgiaweather.net. This University of Georgia network has 71 automated weather stations statewide.(David Emory Stooksbury is the state climatologist and a professor of engineering and atmospheric sciences in the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.) Below are runs of three or more 100-degree days in a row since 1950:Albany (last 100 degree day before 2007: July 16, 2006)::Aug. 1-3, 1999June 28 – July 2, 1998June 22-26, 1998June 21-23, 1990July 31 – Aug. 3, 1986July 20-22, 1986July 13-16, 1986June 5-7, 1985July 25-27, 1983July 23-25, 1981July 15-18, 1981June 16-24, 1981Aug. 21-23, 1980Aug. 6-10, 1980July 9-15, 1980July 4-6, 1979June 13-15, 1963May 26-28, 1962May 20-22, 1962September 10-12, 1954July 16-18, 1951June 26-28, 1950Alma (last 100 degree day before 2007: Aug. 6, 2006):June 22-25, 1998Aug. 25-31, 1995Aug. 16-20, 1995July 30-Aug. 2, 1986June 2-6, 1985July 14-17, 1981July 11-13, 1980Aug. 6-8, 1963June 26-28, 1954July 23-25, 1952July 13-15, 1951Athens (last 100 degree day before 2007: Aug. 4, 2006):Aug. 6-9, 2007July 30 – Aug. 1, 1999July 27-29, 1993July 18-22, 1993July 18-21, 1986June 4-6, 1985Aug. 19-24, 1983July 21-24, 1983Aug. 6-9, 1980July 1-3, 1970June 20-22, 1964July 1-3, 1954July 27-29, 1952June 26-28, 1952Atlanta (last 100 degree day before 2007: Aug. 18, 2000):July 27-29, 1993July 19-21, 1986Aug. 6-9, 1980July 11-13, 1980July 22-24, 1952Augusta (last 100 degree day before 2007: Aug. 4, 2006):Aug. 5-9, 2007Aug. 10-14, 1999July 30 – Aug. 1, 1999June 27-30, 1998July 28-30, 1993July 19-21, 1993July 9-11, 1993July 3-6, 1993June 8-11, 1993July 5-11, 1990June 29 – July 1, 1990July 22-24, 1987July 18-21, 1986July 8-11, 1986June 1-6, 1985Aug. 19-23, 1983Aug. 5-8, 1980July 11-13, 1980June 27-29, 1978July 20-22, 1977July 7-12, 1977Aug. 21-24, 1968July 31 – Aug. 3, 1953July 28-30, 1952July 20-24, 1952June 24-28, 1952July 12-14, 1951June 24-27, 1950Blairsville (last 100 degree day before 2007: June 29, 1936) Blairsville has only reached 100 degrees three times since temperature records started in 1931:July 23, 1934July 25, 1934June 29, 1936Columbus (last 100 degree day before 2007: July 16, 2006):Aug. 16-19, 2000July 30 – Aug. 2, 1999Aug. 14-18, 1995July 20-22, 1993July 30 – Aug. 2, 1986July 19-21, 1986June 4-6, 1985Aug. 20-24, 1983July 10-14, 1980July 13-16, 1977July 6-8, 1977July 23-25, 1952Macon (last 100 degree day before 2007: Aug. 4, 2006):Aug. 7-9, 2007July 18-21, 2006June 21-23, 2006July 17-19, 2002Aug. 11-14, 1999July 31 – Aug. 2, 1999June 28-30, 1998July 26-29, 1993July 16-21, 1993July 6-10, 1990June 30-July 2, 1990June 19-21, 1990July 28 – Aug. 2, 1986July 18-21, 1986July 8-13, 1986June 2-6, 1985Aug. 19-24, 1983July 22-25, 1983July 14-17, 1981Aug. 20-22, 1980Aug. 5-9, 1980July 9-13, 1980June 27-30, 1978July 12-14, 1977July 6-8, 1977June 27-29, 1977June 12-14, 1977July 1-3, 1970Aug. 21-24, 1968July 12-14, 1966June 27-30, 1959Aug. 11-13, 1954June 30 – July 3, 1954June 25-28, 1954July 28-30, 1952July 23-25, 1952July 19-21, 1952June 24-28, 1952July 14-16, 1951July 24-27, 1950Rome (last 100 degree day before 2007: Aug. 11, 2006):July 28-30, 1993July 6-9, 1977Aug. 31-Sept 2, 1957Aug. 1-3, 1957Aug. 9-12, 1956July 28-30, 1955September 3-7, 1954Aug. 14-18, 1954July 13-16, 1954July 4-8, 1954June 30-July 2, 1954June 26-28, 1954July 27-29, 1952July 22-25, 1954Savannah (last 100 degree day before 2007: July 15, 2006):June 28-30, 1998July 16-18, 1993July 10-12, 1993July 18-21, 1986July 8-12, 1986June 1-4, 1985July 17-19, 1983July 13-16, 1981June 21-23, 1981June 15-18, 1981July 10-13, 1980July 7-9, 1977Aug. 4-6, 1954July 23-25, 1952June 24-27, 1952center_img By David Emory StooksburyUniversity of GeorgiaThe impact of hot weather on human and animal health is cumulative and increases with the number of days without relief. Researchers have found a large increase in people and animals suffering major heat-related health problems beginning on the third day of a heat wave.Just as important, and sometimes more important, is how much cooling occurs at night. If the heat index at night doesn’t fall below 74 degrees, people and animals have a hard time recovering from the daytime heating. Without adequate recovery time in a cool environment, heat-related health problems increase.The heat-related health problems are a concern especially for the elderly, those with underlying health problems and those on medications that interfere with the body’s ability to cool.Because of the dire consequences of heat-related medical problems, be sure you check or friends and relatives during the current heat wave.Since the impact of heat is cumulative, check a number of times over the next several days. Even when the high temperatures fall back into the middle 90s, checking on family and friends is still in order.Animals that can’t get to well-ventilated shade and don’t have a ready supply of cool, fresh, drinking water are also at risk. A doghouse in an open pen doesn’t supply well-ventilated shade.Many locations in Georgia are approaching 103 degrees this week. Here are the last times these Georgia places reached 103 degrees or higher prior to 2007:last_img read more

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  • Cow Matchmaking Course

    first_img “Nobody else in our field is teaching this,” said Katarzyna Stachowicz, one of Misztal’s students in the current short course and a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Guelph in Ontario. “If you want to learn (computing in animal breeding) than you have to come here.” Misztal’s computer breeding programs are world-renowned. The program works like an online dating website for cows, but instead of polling users about shared interests, it takes into account factors like milk production, growth rates and genotypic information. While the relationship between individual genes and the combinations of genes the positive traits they lead to isn’t precisely known, information in a cow or bull’s genome can give animal breeders useful information about the animal’s future performance, Bertrand said. “Where the (genomic information) really helps is when an animal is very young and you don’t have much information about his progeny,” Bertrand said. “This genomic information is good for providing a more accurate prediction of how an animal’s progeny will perform.” Misztal, who first studied computer engineering before continuing his studies in animal science, created his first computer package in 1986. It was used worldwide for genetics improvement of major species. “I gain from international collaboration; many of my ideas depend on collaboration,” Misztal said. Not every student at Misztal’s short course this summer was interested in breeding cattle; his program can be modified to work for other animals. In the future the algorithms that Misztal uses in the breeding program may also be used for medical research and other genomic research. This process provides breeders the information they need to pick a bull to mate with their cows. His methods and programs are used by the major dairy, swine and chicken breeding companies in the U.S. like the Holstein Association, the Angus Association, Smithfield and PIC and Cobb-Vantress. University of Georgia animal and dairy scientist Ignacy Misztal develops software programs to help cattlemen select more productive cow couplings. His unique bovine matchmaking skills have earned him an international fan base of animal breeders and researchers. Using a programing language called Fortran, Misztal’s methods are usually much faster, yet simpler than traditional methods. For three weeks in May and June, 55 animal and dairy science students and livestock-breeding professionals from around the world gathered in Athens to learn about Misztal’s groundbreaking methods and computer programs. Participants came from as far away as New Zealand and Brazil to learn his computerized matchmaking techniques. Animal rating and breeding groups, such as the Holstein Association, have used databases full of production information for years; however, the addition of the genetic information is relatively new, and it’s where the industry is heading. Breeders can look at the growth rates and milk production records of individual animals to evaluate the breeding value of their parents. However, if a breeding animal doesn’t have many offspring it’s hard to evaluate them for breeding. That’s when looking at an animals genetic make up can be helpful. Misztal’s method, single-step GBLUP, is the first of its kind to integrate information from databases containing genotypic information on individual animals and observed information about those animals to recommend future breeding matches. This method, developed in collaboration with scientists from France, Uruguay and New Zealand, was also put in a computer program. “It is difficult to run both of those types of information together, and he has developed a one-step method for doing so,” said Keith Bertrand, director of UGA Department of Animal and Dairy Sciences. “Everyone is coming here to learn about it and to pick his brain about building these kinds of programs.” last_img read more

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