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  • New COVID-19 Death, 174 New Cases Reported In Chautauqua County

    first_imgNumber Zip Code 23 2 Active Case Rate (per 100,000 residents) 201.2 14718- Cassadaga0 3.95% 193.6 347.5 18 25 0.0 15 14767- Panama3 56 65 14081- Irving2 0.60% 233.0 14726- Conewango Valley2 Active Cases 14738- Frewsburg13 22 14063- Fredonia21 3.6% 4.7% 14782- Sinclairville3 14736- Findley Lake2 505.4 14787- Westfield4 50-59346 0.7% 3.4% WNY News Now / MGN Stock Image.MAYVILLE – A new COVID-19 related death and 174 new cases of the virus have been reported in Chautauqua County.The Health Department, in an update to the COVID-19 Dashboard, says the 23rd COVID death involved a 90-year-old.Of the new cases, 441 are active with 23 hospitalized. Furthermore, 1,741 people are quarantined countywide.Additionally, health leaders say the seven-day average positivity rate is 7.9 percent, up from 6.3 percent last week. To date there have been 2,477 cases of the virus in the county, with 2,013 recovered.The data ranges from Friday to Sunday.A full breakdown of the update is posted below:COVID-19 Cases by ZIP Code of Residence Percent of Total Cases 192.3 0.4% 0.97% 3 3 2.3% 2 8 0 0.8% 1.2% 12.47% 14775- Ripley4 1.9% 0 14136- Silver Creek10 0.58% 23 20-29484 17.0% 1.6% 421 Age 14757- Mayville2 14720- Celoron0 0.9% 32 0 0.9% 4 2477 50-592 88 5.88% 2 1.4% 12.52% 399 634.1 4 Percent 14724- Clymer7 13 7.15% 0-19335 25.4% 12.52% 21 58 New Cases Total Cases 0.4% 100.0% 0.93% 85 14701- Jamestown43 Age Group 10 14728- Dewittville2 COVID-19 Cases by Known Age No310 211.0 14733- Falconer3 80-897 10 5 5 630 14048- Dunkirk9 14722- Chautauqua0 60-69310 14062- Forestville5 3 Fatality Rate by Age Group 9 40-49333 2.3% 18 30-39309 COVID-19 Cases by Presence of Symptoms at Time of Interview 14784- Stockton0 16 23 8.05% NYS Fatality Rate: 4.86%US Fatality Rate: 1.9%Source: John Hopkins University COVID-19 Tracker 12/9/2020 0.7% All Ages23 34 1030.9 46 Yes1151 28 5 176.3 370.4 70-797 99.7 2.6% 197.4 30 1.3% 1 1.2% 14712- Bemus Point9 35 395.3 40 10 478.7 723.7 21.22% 2 Total 328.5 0.1% 14740- Gerry3 23 19.54% 116 136.3 0.8% 14138- South Dayton1 0.0% 3.51% 19 30 260.1 51 54.7 14723- Cherry Creek2 80-8987 13.52% 1.37% Percent 340.2 19 14750- Lakewood9 153.0 14769- Portland2 107 0.0 461.8 Fatality Rate 13.44% 8 57 Symptoms 513.0 70-79177 1 255.6 11 90+34 14710- Ashville5 441 14716- Brocton2 182.1 370.7 3.9% 78.78% 16.1% 7 0.6% 550.6 862.3 Total Deaths Symptoms Known1461 97 14747- Kennedy1 0-390 0.00% 2.3% 0.4% 10 0.8% 60-693 14781- Sherman5 0.1% 174 10 Number 90+2 40-492 269.3 Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window),Why is 14742 missing?last_img read more

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  • Dairy Production

    first_imgGeorgia’s hot and humid climate presents challenges for the state’s dairy farmers. A newly hired University of Georgia scientist hopes to find some solutions. Sha Tao, a dairy scientist who specializes in heat stress physiology, joined the UGA Department of Animal and Dairy Science on the Tifton Campus on July 1. He was hired to study heat stress nutrition, management and physiology. Seventy-five percent of his time will be spent conducting research and 25 percent will be spent sharing his findings through UGA Extension.“Nationwide, heat stress is a billion dollar problem, especially in the southeastern states like Georgia, Florida and Tennessee. The summers are hotter and longer,” he said. When cows are exposed to temperatures above 70 degrees, their milk production level decreases, Tao said. “In the summertime, cows produce less milk; they have a hard time getting pregnant, and they also have some health issues.”Tao will research heat stress physiology in dairy cattle and find answers to questions like: How can cows better cope with summer temperatures that exceed 90 degrees every day? And, how can cows produce more milk when they eat less in order to produce less body heat? “It’s a very important research area for the Southeast, given our really hot, humid climate. That climate is very challenging to dairy cows,” said Joe West, who was a dairy scientist prior to becoming the UGA Tifton Campus assistant dean. “I think the heat stress research and Extension programs that Dr. Tao will deliver are very important,” West said. “As our animals get more productive, they’re even more subject to the effects of hot and humid weather.”West equates it to running instead of walking in hot weather. “You’re going to sweat more if you’re running,” he said. “Cows work harder as they get more productive. Heat stress will continue to be a problem. If global warming proves to be a reality, it will be a greater problem.”Georgia’s dairy industry has been successful despite its warm climate. According to UGA’s Center for Agribusiness and Economic Development, dairy generated $338.3 million in farm gate value, accounting for 22 percent of the livestock and aquaculture sector. Despite those numbers, West says there is a milk deficit in the Southeast. The bulk of Georgia’s milk is imported from other parts of the country. If more production is generated in Georgia, milk would cost less for Georgia’s consumers. “You don’t see cows all over the countryside like you would in Wisconsin or Pennsylvania, but the dairy industry is a fairly large industry in the Southeast and in Georgia. This is, despite the climate, a very good place to dairy because you can grow a lot of forage crops. Since we have something growing year round, we can recycle our waste nutrients very effectively,” West said. Macon County was Georgia’s top dairy county in 2012, generating $47.3 million in farm gate value with 13,000 head of cattle. Brooks County was second with 10,000 head of cattle and $40 million in farm gate value.last_img read more

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  • Environmentalists push strict coal ash cleanup plan as a jobs initiative for Colstrip area

    first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Billings Gazette:A Montana conservation group is urging the state to hold Colstrip power plant ash pond cleanup to the highest possible standard, a move it says would keep 218 workers employed for a decade.Drawing on its federally funded 2019 study of Colstrip cleanup options, the Northern Plains Resource Council said Wednesday that completely de-watering the power plant’s coal ash ponds and putting the ash in dry storage would do the most to stop groundwater contamination, and keep more than 200 people employed.An estimated 200 million gallons of contaminated water seeps from Colstrip ash ponds every year. The area’s groundwater is undrinkable. The town of Colstrip relies on drinking water pumped from the Yellowstone River primarily to serve the power plant. A highly concentrated coal ash sludge known as “bottom ash” is the most harmful pollution in the 800-plus-acre pond complex. The contaminants of concern, according to Montana’s Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ), are: boron, sulfate, molybdenum, manganese, lithium, selenium and cobalt.The Montana DEQ has asked Colstrip operator Talen Energy to consider excavating ash from the Colstrip ponds. Depending on which cleanup options DEQ agrees to, the cost of the project could be $400 million to $700 million. Those cost estimates, for the cleanup of all three ponds, were produced by Talen and Colstrip’s largest utility shareholder, Puget Sound Energy, according to DEQ.Talen Energy hasn’t backed full excavation as its preferred cleanup plan. DEQ will decide which cleanup measures are most adequate.Northern Plains’ Kate French said the “high and dry” cleanup measures preferred by the conservation group would increase the remediation cost to $900 million.More: Coal ash pollution cleanup could create 200 Colstrip jobs for a decade, conservationists say Environmentalists push strict coal ash cleanup plan as a jobs initiative for Colstrip arealast_img read more

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  • In Memoriam

    first_img March 15, 2004 In Memoriam In Memoriam Stephen Alexander, Miami Admitted 1965; Died November 8, 2003 Bjarne B. Andersen, Jr., Tallahassee Admitted 1953; Died December 26, 2003 Gary E. Brinson, Durham, N.C. Admitted 1978; Died October 15, 2003 Kevin Vincent Canipelli, Jacksonville Admitted 1969; Died January 24, 2004 Dennis Jay Corder, Pensacola Admitted 1996; Died December 30, 2003 Harold B. Haimowitz, Boca Raton Admitted 1994; Died November 28, 2003 John Conan Harrison, Shalimar Admitted 1974; Died January 5, 2004 Carl William Laystrom, Tallahassee Admitted 1953; Died December 25, 2003 Thomas Patrick McAlvanah, Zephyrhills Admitted 1976; Died December 10, 2003 Johnie A. McLeod, Apopka Admitted 1950; Died November 16, 2003 Kenneth Michael Meer, Winter Park Admitted 1976; Died January 31, 2004 George Hemphill Moss II, Vero Beach Admited 1964; Died January 4, 2004 Marvin U. Mounts, Jr., West Palm Beach Admitted 1959; January 3, 2004 Harvey Paul Muslin, Tampa Admitted 1980; Died January 25, 2004 Segismundo Antonio Pares, Ocala Admitted 1973; Died January 3, 2004 Ralph W. Nimmons, Jr., Jacksonville Admitted 1963; Died November 24, 2003 Melvin E. Page, Jr., St. Petersburg Admitted 1957; Died February 19, 2002 John Allison Rudd, Tallahassee Admitted 1950; Died January 29, 2004 Richard Frank Scott, Ft. Lauderdale Admitted 1964; Died January 28, 2003 Thomas A.T. Taylor, Tampa Admitted 1971; Died August 10, 2003 In Memoriamlast_img read more

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  • Align your vision and strategy to fulfill your mission

    first_imgFresh off a recent strategic planning session with the board of directors, Financial Partners Credit Union President/CEO Nader Moghaddam walked into a meeting involving every manager in the organization.He witnessed something enviable: Philosophical, cultural, and financial alignment.“Everybody’s aligned in the correct way so we can all row in the same direction,” Moghaddam tells the CUNA News Podcast. “That alignment is key—as in any endeavor—if we’re going to be successful in delivering on our mission or vision, which is building lifetime financial partnerships with our members.“That means making sure our vision is aligned with our strategy, which is aligned with our business plans, which is aligned with our budgets, which is aligned with individual goals,” adds Moghaddam, chair of the CUNA CEO Council. “We need to have a clear line from our vision to what a teller, phone center representative, or mortgage consultant is doing.” continue reading » 12SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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  • Skelos Corruption Trial Expected to Begin Tuesday

    first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Jury selection began Monday in the case of New York State Sen. Dean Skelos (R-Rockville Centre) and his son, Adam, whose trial on corruption charges is expected to start Tuesday at Manhattan federal court.U.S. District Court Judge Kimba Wood peppered potential jurors with more than 50 questions quizzing their ability to be fair and not let any biases sway their deliberations—should they be among the 12 jurors and four alternates picked. Ironically, only a minority of the group was able to name their state legislative representatives when asked.“I believe I know the Assembly person, however, there’s just been an election, so I could be wrong,” said a 65-year-old Manhattan woman, who was among eight of about 60 potential jurors to say they knew who represented them in either the state Senate or Assembly.Skelos and son have pleaded not guilty to allegedly extorting bribes from three companies in the form of jobs for Adam in exchange for legislative help from the senator, who resigned his post as majority leader shortly after his arrest in May.Opening statements are expected as early as Tuesday afternoon in the Skelos case, which comes as the trial against state Assemb. Sheldon Silver (D-Manhattan), the former Speaker of the Assembly, enters its third week in the same courthouse. Silver also pleaded not guilty to similar charges for allegedly abusing his power.While the high-profile cases involving two former members of the so-called “three men in a room” that set the state’s legislative agenda—the third being Gov. Andrew Cuomo—is closely watched by political observers, some potential jurors suggested that the case may be too boring for them to focus.A 68-year-old Westchester man who said he once served as a juror on a murder trial told Wood that he thought the case would be interesting, but he found it difficult to pay attention. When Wood promised that jurors in the Skelos case would have breaks to stretch as well as coffee and muffins, he said it’s “sounding better,” sparking laughter in the courtroom.Later, when another potential juror who said they knew their state Senator was asked to identify their representative, the 46-year-old Manhattan man gave the name Schumer—as in U.S. Sen. Charles Schumer (D-NY). Wood corrected the juror, noting that Schumer is a member of the U.S. Senate, not the state Senate, but said she understood the confusion.“He does represent a state, after all,” Wood said.last_img read more

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  • Mount Sinai Woman Dies in Car Crash

    first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A 39-year-old woman died after the car she was a passenger in had crashed into another vehicle in the victim’s hometown of Mount Sinai over the weekend.Suffolk County police said Tejas Acharekar, 25, of Port Jefferson, was making a left turn in a Toyota Camry from Route 25A onto Chestnut Street when the driver hit a Hyundai Sonata at 11 p.m. Friday.Ekaterina Blednykh, a passenger in the Camry, was taken to John T. Mather Memorial Hospital in Port Jefferson, where she was pronounced dead.Acharekar and the woman driving the Hyundai were taken to Stony Brook University Hospital for treatment of non-life-threatening injuries.Sixth Squad detectives are continuing the investigation and ask anyone with information on this crash to call them at 631-854-8652.last_img read more

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  • WHO sets meeting on flu pandemic containment

    first_imgMar 3, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – Public health experts will meet in Geneva next week to continue developing the World Health Organization’s (WHO’s) draft plan for quick action to head off a potential influenza pandemic.The WHO announced the meeting as a Hong Kong official reported another possible human case of H5N1 avian flu in China, involving a 32-year-old man who died yesterday.The WHO released a draft rapid-response plan at a Tokyo meeting in January. More than 30 experts in epidemiology, virology, public health, laboratory issues, and other disciplines will meet Mar 6 through 8 in Geneva to continue work on the plan, the WHO announced today.Officials said the meeting would focus on three areas: operations (logistics), surveillance and epidemiology, and public health measures, such as quarantines, antiviral treatment, and social distancing, the agency said.WHO spokeswoman Fadela Chaib said the purpose of the meeting is “to decide who—the WHO, its members nations and its partners—would do what in the event of a pandemic,” according to an Agence France-Presse (AFP) report published today.Many experts are skeptical that stopping an emerging pandemic is possible, and the WHO has acknowledged that it will be very difficult at best.”Even if the pandemic cannot be stopped, public health interventions might buy time to allow countries to further strengthen their response systems, as well as accelerating the production of pandemic vaccine,” the agency said today.The WHO draft plan released in January called for completion of the strategy in time to allow training of rapid-response teams to begin in May.In Hong Kong today, a health department official said a 32-year-old man died of suspected avian flu yesterday in the southern Chinese city of Guangzhou, according to an AFP report today.The man had fallen ill with a fever and pneumonia on Feb 22, a spokesman for Hong Kong’s Centre for Health Protection was quoted as saying. He said China’s health ministry and the Guangdong provincial health department had told Hong Kong that the man had a suspected case of avian flu.If confirmed, the case would be China’s 15th human case of avian flu and 9th death.The report came a day after Chinese Vice Premier Hui Liangyu warned that China could face more human cases and poultry outbreaks of avian flu this spring.Elsewhere, Azerbaijan today reported its first outbreak of H5N1 flu in farm poultry, according to an AFP report. The virus was first reported in wild birds in Azerbaijan 3 weeks ago.Agriculture Minister Ismet Abbassov said about 500,000 birds had already been killed in an effort to contain the poultry outbreak, AFP reported.Also today, the Netherlands-based environmental organization Wetlands International accused five countries of refusing to cooperate with its efforts to study H5N1 flu in wild birds, according to another AFP report.The organization said Sudan, Turkey, Tunisia, Iran, and Nigeria have refused to admit research teams, the story said. The group blamed the countries’ reluctance on fear of the possible effects on poultry exports and tourism if infected birds were found.The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization has commissioned Wetlands International and the French agricultural research center Cirad to study H5N1 among wild birds in Africa, Europe, and the Middle East, according to AFP.”It becomes harder to predict new outbreaks and to take the right precautions if we don’t know the situation in these important countries,” Wetlands International was quoted as saying.See also:Mar 3 WHO announcementhttp://www.who.int/mediacentre/news/notes/2006/np04/en/index.htmlJan 27 CIDRAP News story “WHO issues rapid-response plan for flu pandemic”last_img read more

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  • US Senate backs bill to punish China over Hong Kong

    first_imgThe US Senate passed legislation on Thursday that would impose mandatory sanctions on people or companies that back efforts by China to restrict Hong Kong’s autonomy, pushing back against Beijing’s new security law for the city.The measure also includes secondary sanctions on banks that do business with anyone found to be backing any crackdown on the territory’s autonomy, potentially cutting them off from American counterparts and limiting access to US dollar transactions.The “Hong Kong Autonomy Act” passed by unanimous consent. To become law, it must also pass the House of Representatives and be signed by President Donald Trump. Topics : Democratic Senator Chris Van Hollen, a lead sponsor, said in the Senate the legislation would send a clear message to Beijing that there would be consequences if it acts to undermine Hong Kong’s autonomy.The Hong Kong sanctions bill almost passed last week, Van Hollen said, but was blocked by Republican Senator Kevin Cramer – who had co-sponsored it – at the request of the Trump administration, which made a late request for technical corrections.The delay underscored the complications of passing legislation pushing back on China, as the administration pursues a trade deal and the two powers grapple for international influence and clash over human rights.US-China relations have worsened since the coronavirus pandemic, which began in China, hit the United States.center_img China’s security legislation prompted Trump to initiate a process to eliminate special economic treatment that has allowed Hong Kong to remain a global financial center.China hawks in Congress have pushing for a strong US reaction to any clampdown in Hong Kong.”This could be our last opportunity to stay Beijing’s hand before it destroys what is left of freedom in the city,” said Republican Senator Josh Hawley.The Senate also passed a resolution, introduced by Hawley, condemning the proposed security law. last_img read more

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  • Spain to honor its 28,400 coronavirus victims

    first_imgTopics : Diplomatic supportAmong those attending will be EU Council head Charles Michel, European Commission president Ursula von der Leyen, European Parliament leader David Sassoli and top EU diplomat Josep Borrell. With a watchful eye on the latest virus outbreaks, Spain pauses Thursday to honor its 28,400 victims at a state ceremony joined by top EU and World Health Organization figures.Barely three weeks after coming out of lockdown, Spain has seen a surge in cases and health officials monitoring more than 120 active outbreaks.The most worrying is in and around the northeastern city of Lerida, where the Catalan regional government has issued a stay-home order affecting 160,000 people.  WHO chief Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus will also attend out of respect for “the great number of people who lost their lives to COVID-19 in Spain and the world,” and to stress the UN health body’s support for those fighting the virus, a spokeswoman said. During the memorial, an orchestra will play Spain’s national anthem along with Brahms’ “Sacred Song” and people affected by the pandemic will also speak. The government, which has been severely criticized for its management of the crisis, declared a 10-day mourning period for the victims in late May — the longest since Spain returned to democracy after the fall of Franco’s dictatorship in 1975.Spain suffered a particularly deadly outbreak of the coronavirus which has officially claimed more than 28,400 lives, making it the seventh worst-hit country in the world in terms of death toll. However, figures provided by the National Statistics Institute (INE) and the Carlos III Health Institute showed that in recent months, the death toll in Spain had been between 43,000 and 44,000 higher than the monthly average. But the government says such figures include those who died of other causes or had COVID symptoms and never had a PCR test — a key requirement for being added to the official count. With the population back on the streets and the borders with Europe and a dozen other countries now open, Spain has seen the number of new infections rising. When the epidemic first hit, the government of Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez declared a state of emergency on March 14, allowing it to impose one of the world’s tightest lockdowns.But it has ruled out any renewal of the measure, saying the regional health authorities will be able to control outbreaks. “With the peak behind us, the regions have the necessary tools to tackle particular situations. Fresh outbreaks were expected and are occurring in all countries,” deputy prime minister Carmen Calvo said on Tuesday.  Authorities there and in several other regions have stepped up precautions, with mask-wearing compulsory in public at all times, even if the safety distance can be respected. last_img read more

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